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Accuweather Radar MSP Accuweather Radar MN Coon Rapids Midwest Warnings Warnings
Courtesy AccuWeather Courtesy AccuWeather   Courtesy AccuWeather Courtesy WU Courtesy WU
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Updated: @ 21-Sep-2020 23:55 - next update at 00:00  
Summary / Temperature Wind Rain Outlook
Night time, Dry Night time, Dry
Currently: 60.1F, Max: 77.4F, Min: 59.4F 60.1°F
Colder 2.4°F than last hour.

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Feels like: 60°F

24-hr difference
-5.2°FColder 5.2°F than yesterday at this time.
  Today Yesterday
High: 77.4°F
17:15
72.8°F
16:39
Low: 59.4°F
07:12
54.4°F
05:59
 Calm SE
0.0
Gust:
0.0 mph
0 Bft - Calm
Today: 10.4 mph 01:02
Gust Month: 23.0 mph September 3
Rain Today: 0.00 in
Rain Rate (/hr): 0.000 in
Rain Yesterday: 0.00 in
Storm Rain: 0.00 in
This Month: 0.71 in
Season Total: 18.05 in
6 rain days in September.
Tuesday

Tuesday: Sunny
Sunny
Humidity & Barometer Almanac Moon
Humidity: 79 % Increased 2.0% since last hour.
Dew Point: 53.6°F Decreased 1.7°F since last hour.
Barometer: 30.036 inHg Rising 0.01  inHg/hr
Baro Trend: Steady
 
Sunrise: 07:01
Sunset: 19:11
Moonrise: 13:28
Moonset: 21:49
Daylight: 12:10 00:56:52
Waxing Crescent
Waxing Crescent, Moon at 5 days in cycle
30%
Illuminated
UV Index Forecast UV Index Forecast
22-Sep-2020
5.9     Medium 
23-Sep-2020
5.9     Medium 
Air Quality Live Weather (WDL) Live Weather (CWOP) Wind Chill
Current AQI
84


Moderate
Weather Display Live CWOP Live
Current: 60.1°F
Today Min: 59.4°F  at 7:12 AM
Yesterday: 54.4°F
Record: -45.6°F
Jan-30-2019
VP Console Trend (60 Mins Ago) Day and Night Warnings
VP Console
Temp: -2.5°F
Baro: 0.01 inHg
Hum: 2%
Dew PT: -1.7°F
(Noon)
(Midnight)
 NWS Weather Forecast  - Outlook: Tonight & Tuesday
Tonight

Tonight: Mostly Clear
Mostly Clear

Lo 58 °F
NWS forecast: Mostly clear, with a low around 58. South southwest wind 0 to 5 mph.
 
Tuesday

Tuesday: Sunny
Sunny

Hi 82 °F
NWS forecast: Sunny, with a high near 82. South wind 0 to 5 mph.
Animated icons courtesy of www.meteotreviglio.com.
 Weather On This Day History
Weather History for September 21 (National)
 
1938
A great hurricane smashed into Long Island and bisected New England causing a massive forest blowdown and widespread flooding. Winds gusted to 186 mph at Blue Hill MA, and a storm surge of nearly thirty feet caused extensive flooding along the coast of Rhode Island. The hurricane killed 600 persons and caused 500 million dollars damage. The hurricane, which lasted twelve days, destroyed 275 million trees. Hardest hit were Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Long Island NY. The ""Long Island Express"" produced gargantuan waves with its 150 mph winds, waves which smashed against the New England shore with such force that earthquake-recording machines on the Pacific coast clearly showed the shock of each wave. (David Ludlum) (The Weather Channel)

1989
Hurricane Hugo slammed into the South Carolina coast about 11 PM, making landfall near Sullivans Island. Hurricane Hugo was directly responsible for thirteen deaths, and indirectly responsible for twenty-two others. A total of 420 persons were injured in the hurricane, and damage was estimated at eight billion dollars, including two billion dollars damage to crops. Sustained winds reached 85 mph at Folly Beach SC, with wind gusts as high was 138 mph. Wind gusts reached 98 mph at Charleston, and 109 mph at Shaw AFB. The biggest storm surge occurred in the McClellanville and Bulls Bay area of Charleston County, with a storm surge of 20.2 feet reported at Seewee Bay. Shrimp boats were found one half mile inland at McClellanville. (National Weather Summary) (Storm Data)

 
Weather History for September 21 (Minnesota)
 
2005
An unusually intense late season severe weather event affects parts of central Minnesota and west central Wisconsin during the late afternoon and evening hours. Baseball-sized hail, damaging thunderstorm winds, and tornadoes result from several supercell thunderstorms. The most widespread damage occurs across the northern and eastern portions of the Twin Cities. Three tornadoes rake across parts of Anoka and northern Hennepin counties, including an F2, but the tornado damage is overshadowed by the widespread extreme wind damage associated with the rear flank downdraft of the supercell. In addition to the severe weather, many locations received substantial amounts of rain. Many streets and underpasses in the northern Twin Cities metro area were flooded Wednesday night, where radar precipitation estimates were in excess of 3 inches.

1994
1/2 inch hail in Blue Earth County results in $6 million in crop damages.

1924
Very strong winds occur in Duluth, with a peak gust of 64 mph.

Data courtesy of NOAA
More Weather History Exists (National)  [MORE]